November 2017

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“Strangers in Their Own Land: Where Do We Go from Here?”

“Strangers in Their Own Land: Where Do We Go from Here?”

November 01, 2017
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Location: 

Barnard Hall, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 Room/Area: Room 418 - James Room

Event Type: 

Coming to Terms with a Polarized Society

Featuring:

Arlie R. Hochschild, Professor of Sociology Emerita, University of California, Berkeley.
“Strangers in Their Own Land: Where Do We Go from Here?”

Panelists:
Frederick Harris, Dean of Social Sciences and Professor of Political Science, Columbia University.
Nicholas Lemann, Joseph Pulitzer II and Edith Pulitzer Moore Professor of Journalism and Dean Emeritus of the Faculty of Journalism, Columbia University; staff writer for the New Yorker.

Free and open to the public. No RSVP required.

Event Contact Information:
Kathryn Herrera
kah2213@columbia.edu

5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
Ana Bracic (Oklahoma)

Ana Bracic (Oklahoma)

November 01, 2017

Event Type: 

Ana Bracic (Oklahoma) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
 
 
 
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Dan Mattingly (Yale)

Dan Mattingly (Yale)

November 08, 2017

Event Type: 

Dan Mattingly (Yale) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
"Professional Journalism, Polarization, Post-Truth, and Post-Trump."

"Professional Journalism, Polarization, Post-Truth, and Post-Trump."

November 09, 2017
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Location: 

Barnard Hall, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 Room/Area: Room 418 - James Room

Event Type: 

Coming to Terms with a Polarized Society

Featuring:

Michael Schudson, Professor of Journalism, Columbia University.
"Professional Journalism, Polarization, Post-Truth, and Post-Trump."

Panelists:
Leonard Downie, Jr., Weil Family Professor of Journalism, Arizona State University; Former Executive Editor, Washington Post.
Bill Keller, Editor-in-Chief, The Marshall Project; Former Executive Editor, New York Times.

Free and open to the public. No RSVP required.

Event Contact Information:
Kathryn Herrera
kah2213@columbia.edu

5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
Cognition & Decision Seminar Series: Various approaches to online inference — human behavior and theoretical models

Cognition & Decision Seminar Series: Various approaches to online inference — human behavior and theoretical models

November 09, 2017
6:00pm - 7:30pm

Location: 

Uris 326

Event Type: 

Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm in Uris 326
Cognition & Decision Seminar Series: Rava Azeredo da Silveira

Title: Various approaches to online inference — human behavior and theoretical models

Abstract:

In natural settings, we make decisions based on streams of partial and noisy information. Arguably, we summarize the perceived information into a probabilistic model of the world, which we can exploit to make decisions. This talk will explore such ‘mental models’ in the context of idealized tasks that can be carried out in the laboratory and modeled quantitatively. The starting point of the talk will be a sequential inference task that probes inference in changing environments, in humans. I will describe the task and an experimental finding, namely, that humans make use of fine differences in temporal statistics when making inferences. While our observations agrees qualitatively with an optimal inference model, the data exhibit biases. What is more, human responses, unlike those of the optimal model, are variable, and this behavioral variability is itself modulated during the inference task. In order to uncover the putative algorithmic framework employed by humans, I will go on to examine a family of models that break away from the optimal model in diverse ways. This investigation will suggest a picture in which humans carry out inference using noisy mental representations. More specifically, rather than representing a whole probability function, human subjects may manipulate probabilities using a (possibly modest) number of samples. The approach just outlines illustrates a range of possible computational structures of sub-optimal inference, but it lacks the appeal of a normative framework. If time permits, I will discuss recent ideas on a normative approach to human inference subject to internal ‘costs’ or ‘drives’, which can explain various biases. While different in its formulation, this approach shares conceptual commonalities with the rational inattention theory and other constrained optimization frameworks in cognitive science.

6:00pm - 7:30pm
 
112th: Lauren-Brooke Eisen on Inside Private Prisons with Vincent Schiraldi

112th: Lauren-Brooke Eisen on Inside Private Prisons with Vincent Schiraldi

November 09, 2017
7:00pm

Location: 

536 W 112th St New York, NY 10025

Event Type: 

112th: Lauren-Brooke Eisen on Inside Private Prisons with Vincent Schiraldi

Event date: 11/09/2017 - 7:00pm

Join us at 7pm on Thursday, November 9th at Book Culture on 112th St. as Lauren-Brooke Eisen discusses Inside Private Prisons: An American Dilemma in the Age of Mass Incarceration. She will be joined in conversation by Vincent Schiraldi.

Click here to RSVP on Facebook!

When the tough-on-crime politics of the 1980s overcrowded state prisons, private companies saw potential profit in building and operating correctional facilities. Today more than a hundred thousand of the 1.5 million incarcerated Americans are held in private prisons in twenty-nine states and federal corrections. Private prisons are criticized for making money off mass incarceration--to the tune of $5 billion in annual revenue. Based on Lauren-Brooke Eisen's work as a prosecutor, journalist, and attorney at policy think tanks, Inside Private Prisons blends investigative reportage and quantitative and historical research to analyze privatized corrections in America.

From divestment campaigns to boardrooms to private immigration-detention centers across the Southwest, Eisen examines private prisons through the eyes of inmates, their families, correctional staff, policymakers, activists, Immigration and Customs Enforcement employees, undocumented immigrants, and the executives of America's largest private prison corporations. Private prisons have become ground zero in the anti-mass-incarceration movement. Universities have divested from these companies, political candidates hesitate to accept their campaign donations, and the Department of Justice tried to phase out its contracts with them. On the other side, impoverished rural towns often try to lure the for-profit prison industry to build facilities and create new jobs. Neither an endorsement or a demonization, Inside Private Prisons details the complicated and perverse incentives rooted in the industry, from mandatory bed occupancy to vested interests in mass incarceration. If private prisons are here to stay, how can we fix them? This book is a blueprint for policymakers to reform practices and for concerned citizens to understand our changing carceral landscape.


Lauren-Brooke Eisen is senior counsel in the Brennan Center's Justice Program, where she focuses on changing financial incentives in the criminal-justice system. Previously she was a senior program associate at the Vera Institute of Justice in the Center on Sentencing and Corrections, served as an assistant district attorney in New York City, and taught criminal justice at Yale College and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

Vincent Schiraldi is a Senior Research Fellow directing the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management (PCJ) at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). Schiraldi arrives at HKS with long experience in public life, first coming to prominence as founder of the policy think tank, the Justice Policy Institute, then moving to government as director of the juvenile corrections in Washington, DC, and then as Commissioner of the New York City Department of Probation. Most recently Schiraldi served as Senior Advisor to the New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice.

Event address:

536 W 112th St

New York, NY 10025

Can't make it? Reserve a signed copy by clicking here.

 

 

7:00pm
 
The Encounter between Buddhism and Other Religious Traditions in East Asia

The Encounter between Buddhism and Other Religious Traditions in East Asia

November 10, 2017
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Location: 

Kent Hall 403

Event Type: 

The Encounter between Buddhism and Other Religious Traditions in East Asia

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Friday, November 10, 2017

Kent Hall 403

To see the agenda and to register, please click here.

 

Participants:

Michael Como, Columbia University

Bernard Faure, Columbia University

Jongmyung Kim, Academy of Korean Studies

Jongwook Kim, Dongguk University

Seong-Uk Kim, Columbia University

Young Tae Kim, Dongguk University

Silong Li, Beijing University

Kenryo Minowa, Tokyo University

D. Max Moerman, Barnard College

 

Sponsored by

The Center for Korean Research, Columbia University Co-sponsored by The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University; Department of Religion, Columbia University; The Academy of Korean Studies, Seoul, Korea; Columbia Alumni Association of Korea, Seoul, Korea

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
 
 
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Jacob Kopas (Political Science), “Legitimizing the State or a Grievance? Property Rights and Political Engagement”

Jacob Kopas (Political Science), “Legitimizing the State or a Grievance? Property Rights and Political Engagement”

November 14, 2017
4:00-5:00 PM: Presentation 5:00-6:00 PM: Reception & Food

Location: 

Lindsay Rogers Room (Room 707) 7th Floor International Affairs Building

Event Type: 

Summary: “Property rights and the protection of property are fundamental to modern political theory. Struggles over rural land have sparked revolutions and political movements all over the world. But without the backing of the State and strong institutions, is a property right anything more than a worthless scrap of parchment? This presentation will discuss the symbolic power of legal property rights to change political attitudes and behavior. We will examine evidence from statistical analysis and in person interviews on Peru’s massive, rural land titling programs from 1996-2007 which granted nearly 2 million land titles to Peruvian farmers.”

4:00-5:00 PM: Presentation 5:00-6:00 PM: Reception & Food
 
Jessica Pisano (New School)

Jessica Pisano (New School)

November 15, 2017

Event Type: 

Jessica Pisano (New School) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
 
 
 
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