September 2017

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Sept 7th, 2017 -- Tim Frye (Columbia University

Sept 7th, 2017 -- Tim Frye (Columbia University

September 07, 2017

Location: 

Lindsay Rogers Room, 707 IAB

Event Type: 

Please join CUIPS for TImothy Frye's presentation, "Economic Sanctions and Public Opinion: Survey Experiments from Russia." A light lunch will be served at 12:15pm followed by the talk at 12:30pm.

Abstract: Do economic sanctions turn the public against the government or cause it to rally around the flag? Do government supporters and skeptics respond differently to sanctions? Do sanctions shape attitudes toward the sanctioner? These questions have rarely been explored with survey data, and not in an autocracy. Survey experiments embedded in two national surveys in Russia find that, in contrast to the “orthodox” and the “rally around flag” theories, economic sanctions do not have a direct effect on support for the sanctioned government. However, in line with “scapegoating” arguments, sanctions weaken the impact of economic decline on support for the government. In addition, imposing economic sanctions reduces the favorability of the sanctioner, but the promise of weakening sanctions yields an increase in support for both the target country and the sanctioner. These results suggest the need to reevaluate core assumptions of theories of the impact of economic sanctions.

 
Professor Stark featured documentary on 'Theory Culture and Society'

Professor Stark featured documentary on 'Theory Culture and Society'

September 08, 2017
TBD

Location: 

BCC Website

Event Type: 

Professor David Stark will be featured in a 30 minute documentary for BBC. It is on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of PowerPoint and will be broadcast September 8th. The producer had been directed to a 2008 article of Professor Stark in Theory Culture and Society in which he analyzed Colin Powell’s PowerPoint presentation to the UN Security Council.

TBD
 
 
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Egor Lazarev (Columbia)

Egor Lazarev (Columbia)

September 13, 2017

Location: 

IAB LRR 707

Event Type: 

Egor Lazarev (Columbia) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. This is a practice job talk. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
Autonomy and Archival Absence: Native Nations in the Post-Revolutionary Lower Mississippi Valley

Autonomy and Archival Absence: Native Nations in the Post-Revolutionary Lower Mississippi Valley

September 14, 2017
6:10-8pm

Location: 

Anthropology Department: Sheldon Scheps Memorial Library, Room 457 Schermerhorn Extension

Event Type: 

Elizabeth Ellis, New York University

Abstract

During the Revolutionary Era, the Lower Mississippi River Valley underwent not only a political upheaval but also massive social and economic changes. In the 1760s the region was an Indigenous dominated borderland with a sparse and dependent French colonial population. While the Choctaws were by far the most powerful polity, no single nation dominated the region and many small nations such as the Tunicas, Biloxis, Houmas, and Pascagoulas thrived by leveraging diplomatic relationships and taking advantage of the fluidity of this borderland. However, by the 1790s waves of Spanish and American settlement had transformed the region into a nascent plantation economy. This paper examines the impact of this geopolitical transformation on Indigenous polities during the decades following the American Revolution. 

By comparing the actions and discourses of Native individuals from large nations with those of smaller Native polities, it becomes clear that, while these Indigenous communities were all striving for autonomy, they envisioned very different futures and kinds of relationships with this onslaught of non-Native newcomers. This paper concludes by investigating the sudden disappearance of smaller nations, like the Tunicas, Biloxis, and Pascagoulas, from diplomatic records during the 1780s, and challenges the standard narrative that posits population collapse and community decline as the explanation for this archival silence. 

Pre-circulated paper here

Biography

Elizabeth Ellis is an assistant professor of history at New York University. Liz’s current book project investigates the histories of Louisiana’s small Native American polities during the eighteenth century. Her work analyzes the ways these nations shaped European colonization efforts and influenced the lives of all of the inhabitants of the Lower Mississippi Valley. Unlike many of the larger Indian nations of the Southeast, these “petites nations” did not coalesce or confederate into larger polities during the eighteenth century. Rather, these nations sought alternative military, diplomatic, and economic strategies that would allow them to simultaneously preserve their autonomy while wielding sufficient regional influence to protect their homelands and communities. Her work examines the interactions among these petites nations, including the Chitimachas, Tunicas, Bayagoulas, Houmas, Ofogoulas, Tensas, and Biloxis, and their relationships with larger Native polities and the French, Spanish, British, American, and African peoples who settled in Louisiana. Prior to joining NYU, Liz was the Barra Postdoctoral Fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. 

Additional information about the event and the series available here

Speaker: 

Elizabeth Ellis

Assistant Professor
6:10-8pm
 
 
 
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Samuel Coggeshall (History) and Francisco Lara-Garcia (Sociology), “Restoring Interdisciplinarity to the Study of the Interwar Avant-Garde”

Samuel Coggeshall (History) and Francisco Lara-Garcia (Sociology), “Restoring Interdisciplinarity to the Study of the Interwar Avant-Garde”

September 19, 2017
4:00-5:00 pm: Presentation 5:00-6:00 pm: Reception & Food

Location: 

Lindsay Rogers Room (Room 707) 7th Floor International Affairs Building

Event Type: 

Summary: “Representatives of the interwar modernist avant-garde not only worked across various artistic disciplines and in different media — they often viewed their artistic practice as direct interventions in other fields of human experience. These interventions were to be informed by knowledge derived from emerging scientific and humanistic disciplines, and were premised upon the possibility (and desirability) of interdisciplinary synthetic knowledge. Given this interdisciplinary starting point, the study of the interwar avant-garde would benefit from the application of methodologies from those fields in which their projects sought originally to intervene. This paper will offer four example case studies of how this might be done in the present, in sociology, education, medicine, and psychology.

Contact Information: iserrp-iigss@columbia.edu

4:00-5:00 pm: Presentation 5:00-6:00 pm: Reception & Food
 
Using Data For Good: What does it mean?

Using Data For Good: What does it mean?

September 20, 2017
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Location: 

Uris Hall 301

Event Type: 

The Data, Ethics, and Decision Making Speaker Series presents Dr. Jeannette Wing, the new director of Columbia’s Data Science Institute, on "Using Data for Good: What does it mean?". Professor. Wing will be laying out her vision for the institute, which will focus on her desire to think seriously about the definition and practice of using data for good.

Wine and cheese will be served following the talk.

Speaker Biography

Jeannette Marie Wing is Avanessians Director of the Data Sciences Institute at Columbia University, where she is also a professor of computer science. Until June 30, 2017, she was Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Research with oversight of its core research laboratories around the world and Microsoft Research Connections. Prior to 2013, she was the President's Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. She also served as assistant director for Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the NSF from 2007 to 2010.

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
 
Giancarlo Visconti (Columbia)

Giancarlo Visconti (Columbia)

September 20, 2017

Event Type: 

Giancarlo Visconti (Columbia) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. This is a practice job talk. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
 
 
 
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Maria Snegovaya (Columbia)

Maria Snegovaya (Columbia)

September 27, 2017

Event Type: 

Maria Snegovaya (Columbia) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. This is a practice job talk. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
 
 
 

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