March 2018

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Populism and Religion: The American Case (Day 1)

Populism and Religion: The American Case (Day 1)

March 01, 2018
1:45 PM – 6:00 PM EST

Location: 

Graduate School of Journalism, The World Room 2950 Broadway New York, NY 10027

Event Type: 

You are invited to the upcoming conference, "Populism and Religion: The American Case." The event will be held on Thursday, March 1 and Friday, March 2 in the Columbia School of Journalism's World Room.
 
This event was organized by Jean Cohen and Alexander Stille. The keynote speaker is E.J. Dionne. His lecture is titled "When God Becomes a Populist: People's Religion, Left and Right." It will be held Thursday, March 1 from 4:00-6:00pm. 
 
Pre-registration is required. 
 
Please register using Eventbrite. Please note that Day 1 registration can be found here, and Day 2 registration can be found here. For more information on the event and to see the full list of speakers and topics, please visit our website 
 

DESCRIPTION

PLEASE NOTE: This is a two-day event. Please double check that you are registering for the correct day.

Everyone seems to be writing on populism these days. Given the global rise of populist movements, parties and leaders, this is unsurprising. But the relationship of populism to religion has been understudied. We want to focus on the American case. While it may be distinctive in certain key respects, America is no longer exceptional in linking populist and religious discourse, tropes and justifications. Given its long history with this conundrum, we feel it is instructive to focus on the American populism, past and present to understand its distinctive features and in what way it has and is a harbinger of what we now see emerging elsewhere.

In an opening panel on “Religion and Populism in America: Historical Perspectives / Contemporary Logic,” the conference will consider various forms of American populism, including the intersection of populist and religious rhetoric and the relationship of religious activists to populist politics. We will then turn to the distinction between populist and other social movements, including religious ones. A panel on “Populism, Social Movements, Parties, and Leaders” asks what makes a social movement populist? What role do religious tropes and cultures play in them? Is there a distinctive relationship between populist movements and leaders, or between populist parties and movements? A third panel, “Populism and the Media,” will analyze the relationship between populist politics and the media. As we know, populist leaders and activists criticize the “established” media as unfair and tend to reject expertise and claims to objectivity from journalists, along with scientists, administrators, and other “insiders.” The epithet “fake news” is used to undermine any and all truth claims made in the media. Yet populists make very clever use of the media, old and new. This panel is designed to address how populists make use of old and new media and how the contemporary mediatization of politics fosters populist strategies. Finally, we will have a panel on “Contemporary American Populism, Religion, and Gender.”

Documents: 

1:45 PM – 6:00 PM EST
 
TBD

TBD

March 01, 2018
2:00-3:30pm

Location: 

Knox Hall, 606 W. 122nd Street, NY, NY, 10027, Room 509

Event Type: 

Please join us for the Wealth and Inequality Seminar Series
with Ted Mouw, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Light refreshments will be served

2:00-3:30pm
 
Rhetoric and Evidence in a Polarized Society

Rhetoric and Evidence in a Polarized Society

March 01, 2018
5:00-7:00 PM

Location: 

Event Oval, Diana Center Barnard College 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027

Event Type: 

Coming to Terms with a Polarized Society Lecture Series:

Title: “Rhetoric and Evidence in a Polarized Society”
Thursday, March 1, 2018, 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Event Oval, Diana Center
Barnard College
3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027

Mario L. Small (Harvard) will join Robert Krulwich (Radiolab; NPR) and Nicholas Lemann (Columbia University; The New Yorker) for a panel and discussion on America’s controversies about the nature of poverty, inequality, and economic opportunity. Small argues that the public discourse about these problems is undermined by an inability to communicate evidence about their causes and potential solutions. Some of this evidence is statistical, but much of it stems from qualitative studies about the lives and communities of the disadvantaged. He argues that an enhancement of qualitative reasoning would allow more serious consideration of the evidence, enhance public discourse, and lead to a more effective politics.

Speaker:

Mario Luis Small, Grafstein Family Professor at Harvard University

Panelists:

Robert Krulwich, science correspondent for NPR; co-host of Radiolab.

Nicholas Lemann, Nicholas Lemann, Joseph Pulitzer II and Edith Pulitzer Moore Professor of Journalism and Dean Emeritus of the Faculty of Journalism, Columbia University; staff writer for the New Yorker.

Moderated by Thomas DiPrete, Giddings Professor of Sociology.

Free and open to the public. RVSP encouraged but not required.

RSVP at any of the following:
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/419502948469900/
Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rhetoric-and-evidence-in-a-polarized-societ...
Columbia Calendar Link: https://events.columbia.edu/go/PolarizedSociety4

5:00-7:00 PM
 
Populism and Religion: The American Case (Day 2)

Populism and Religion: The American Case (Day 2)

March 02, 2018
10:00 AM – 5:30 PM EST

Location: 

Graduate School of Journalism, The World Room 2950 Broadway New York, NY 10027

Event Type: 

You are invited to the upcoming conference, "Populism and Religion: The American Case." The event will be held on Thursday, March 1 and Friday, March 2 in the Columbia School of Journalism's World Room.
 
This event was organized by Jean Cohen and Alexander Stille. The keynote speaker is E.J. Dionne. His lecture is titled "When God Becomes a Populist: People's Religion, Left and Right." It will be held Thursday, March 1 from 4:00-6:00pm. 
 
Pre-registration is required. 
 
Please register using Eventbrite. Please note that Day 1 registration can be found here, and Day 2 registration can be found here. For more information on the event and to see the full list of speakers and topics, please visit our website here. 
 

DESCRIPTION

PLEASE NOTE: This is a two-day event. Please double check that you are registering for the correct day.

Everyone seems to be writing on populism these days. Given the global rise of populist movements, parties and leaders, this is unsurprising. But the relationship of populism to religion has been understudied. We want to focus on the American case. While it may be distinctive in certain key respects, America is no longer exceptional in linking populist and religious discourse, tropes and justifications. Given its long history with this conundrum, we feel it is instructive to focus on the American populism, past and present to understand its distinctive features and in what way it has and is a harbinger of what we now see emerging elsewhere.

In an opening panel on “Religion and Populism in America: Historical Perspectives / Contemporary Logic,” the conference will consider various forms of American populism, including the intersection of populist and religious rhetoric and the relationship of religious activists to populist politics. We will then turn to the distinction between populist and other social movements, including religious ones. A panel on “Populism, Social Movements, Parties, and Leaders” asks what makes a social movement populist? What role do religious tropes and cultures play in them? Is there a distinctive relationship between populist movements and leaders, or between populist parties and movements? A third panel, “Populism and the Media,” will analyze the relationship between populist politics and the media. As we know, populist leaders and activists criticize the “established” media as unfair and tend to reject expertise and claims to objectivity from journalists, along with scientists, administrators, and other “insiders.” The epithet “fake news” is used to undermine any and all truth claims made in the media. Yet populists make very clever use of the media, old and new. This panel is designed to address how populists make use of old and new media and how the contemporary mediatization of politics fosters populist strategies. Finally, we will have a panel on “Contemporary American Populism, Religion, and Gender.”

Documents: 

10:00 AM – 5:30 PM EST
 
 
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“The Time of Cure” with Dr. Bharat Venkat

“The Time of Cure” with Dr. Bharat Venkat

March 07, 2018
4:10pm

Location: 

Room 963, Schermerhorn Extension Reception to Follow in the Robert F. Murphy/Morton H. Fried Department of Anthropology Lounge Room 465, Schermerhorn Extension

Event Type: 

4:10pm
 
Just Societies Speaker Series: The Future of Immigration in the United States 2 of 3

Just Societies Speaker Series: The Future of Immigration in the United States 2 of 3

March 08, 2018
4:00pm-5:30pm

Location: 

The World Room, Columbia Journalism

Event Type: 

Dear Colleagues,

It gives me great pleasure to announce the Just Societies Speaker Series, a new initiative I am launching this semester in my role as Dean of the Division of Social Science.

As social scientists, our research provides context, insight, and a deeper understanding of societies in the United States and abroad. My vision for this series is to spotlight the work of peers, here at Columbia and from institutions around the world, who are working in a range of important areas, specifically wealth inequality, criminal justice, immigration, LGBTQ rights, and climate change. 

Each semester, my office will host a distinguished set of scholars, all of whom are experts in their respective fields. I am thrilled to inaugurate this series in three week's time with a talk from Cathy Cohen, the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science at The University of Chicago, who will be presenting on the politics of minority youth in the United States.

Included below is a link to RSVP for all three of the Spring 2018 lectures, featuring sociologistAlejandro Portes of Princeton University and our own Eric Foner. I encourage you to forward the details for the series on to your undergraduate and graduate students. All of these events are free and all are welcome to attend.

Looking forward to seeing you at these events in the coming weeks

Sincerely, 

 

 

Fredrick Harris
Dean of Social Science
Faculty of Arts and Sciences
fh2170@columbia.edu


Speaker

Alejandro Portes
Howard Harrison & Gabrielle Snyder Beck Professor of Sociology (Emeritus), Princeton University 

The Future of Immigration in the United States
March 8, 2018, 4:00pm-5:30pm
The World Room, Columbia Journalism

4:00pm-5:30pm
 
 
 
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Impairment in the Social world a Graduate Student Conference on Disability

Impairment in the Social world a Graduate Student Conference on Disability

March 22, 2018 to March 23, 2018
1:30 pm

Location: 

March 22-23, 2018 Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 w 122nd St, New York Columbia University in the city of New York

Event Type: 

Department of Sociology, Columbia University

Impairment in the Social world a Graduate Student Conference on Disability
 
March 22-23, 2018
Room 509, Knox Hall, 606 w 122nd St, New York
 
 
Columbia University in the city of New York
Conference organizers: Adrianna Bagnall-Munson, Erela Portugaly, Jonathan Lin
 
Keynote speaker: Dr. Allison C. Carey
1:30 pm, March 23rd
 
Film screening and discussion: Keep Rollin’
5 pm, March 22nd
 
Themes: Education, Theory, Welfare state, Expertise, Intersectionality
 
Attendance is free and open to the public
The conference will accommodate all needs and abilities
Please RSVP on http://blogs.cuit.columbia.edu/impairmentsocialworld/
For further inquiries or requests for individualized accommodations email
disabilitysocial2018@gmail.com, or call 646-535-4588
 
 
1:30 pm
 
 
TBD

TBD

March 22, 2018
2:00-3:30pm

Location: 

Knox Hall, 606 W. 122nd Street Ny NY 10027, Room 509

Event Type: 

Please join us for the Wealth and Inequality Seminar Series
with Anna Haskins, Cornell University

Light refreshments will be served

2:00-3:30pm
 
 
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Nation Building: Why Some Countries Come Together While Others Fall Apart

Nation Building: Why Some Countries Come Together While Others Fall Apart

March 27, 2018
6:00 PM–7:30 PM

Location: 

Maison Française, East Gallery, Buell Hall

Event Type: 

Dear friends and colleagues,

We are pleased to welcome Andreas Wimmer for a talk on Nation Building: Why Some Countries Come Together While Others Fall Apart, in conversation with Jack Snyder, Gwyneth McClendron, Deborah Yashar, Prerna Singh and moderated by Shamus Khan..

RSVP information below. We hope to see you there!

 

 

Nation Building: Why Some Countries Come Together While Others Fall Apart
Andreas Wimmer, in conversation with Jack Snyder, Gwyneth McClendron, Deborah Yashar, and Prerna Singh, moderated by Shamus Khan

March 276:00-7:30 PM
Maison Française, East Gallery, Buell Hall
More information and RSVP

Why is national integration achieved in some diverse countries, while others are destabilized by political inequality between ethnic groups, contentious politics, or even separatism and ethnic war? Traversing centuries and continents from early nineteenth-century Europe and Asia to Africa from the turn of the twenty-first century to today, Andreas Wimmer delves into the forces that encourage political alliances to stretch across ethnic divides and build national unity. Wimmer’s theory of nation building focuses on slow-moving, generational processes: the spread of civil society organizations, linguistic assimilation, and the states’ capacity to provide public goods. Offering a long-term historical perspective and global outlook, Nation Building sheds important new light on the challenges of political integration in diverse countries.

Event co-sponsored by the Maison Française, Department of Sociology, Department of Political Science, ISERP, Committee on Global Thought, Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, and Consulate General of Switzerland in New York.  Featured in the New Books in the Arts & Sciences series.

6:00 PM–7:30 PM
 
 
TBD

TBD

March 29, 2018
2:00- 3:30pm

Location: 

Knox Hall, 606 W. 122nd Street, NY NY 10027, Room 509

Event Type: 

Please join us for the Wealth and Inequality Seminar Series
with David Pedulla, Stanford University

Light refreshments will be served

2:00- 3:30pm
 
 
 

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