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National Science Foundation

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Accountable Institutions and Behavior

The Accountable Institutions and Behavior (AIB) Program supports basic scientific research that advances knowledge and understanding of issues broadly related to attitudes, behavior, and institutions connected to public policy and the provision of public services. Research proposals are expected to be theoretically motivated, conceptually precise, methodologically rigorous, and empirically oriented.

Deadline: 

Monday, August 17, 2020
Friday, January 15, 2021

Doctoral Dissertation Research in Economics: Do Identity Concerns Affect Labor Supply?

A sense of identity can be a powerful influence over behavior, including work. Workers who identify themselves as belonging to one group may regard a job associated with a different group as a violation of their identity, especially if the job is associated with a group perceived to have lower social status. This identity channel may partly explain why some groups are over- or under-represented in some occupations. The identity-related mis-representation of groups in occupations leads to a misallocation of talent and cause economic inefficiency.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: On Terror and Trauma: Governance, Law and Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome

While contestation of the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder paradigm is as old as the diagnostic category itself, the debate about what PTSD is and how to compensate victims remains unsolved to this day. Existing scholarship has examined how community organizing for compensation rights by Vietnam veterans, rape survivors, and high-risk workers has influenced the recognition of PTSD as a diagnostic category. But the intertwined juridical and scientific procedures through which PTSD evidence is indeed produced have received scant attention from the social sciences.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Labor Dynamics, Migration, and Intergenerational Community Networks

How do social and historical factors direct migration? This project, which trains a graduate student in methods of rigorous, empirical data collection and analysis, explores how migrants form and sustain communities through histories of connected movement. In tracking a South-South migration route, the researcher aims to ascertain the historical processes by which migrants are channeled into specific forms of labor in different places.

RIDIR: Collaborative Research: Bayesian analytical tools to improve survey estimates for subpopulations and small areas

In this project, a set of tools will be built for in-depth analysis of survey data, making use of and extending statistical methods for estimation for small subgroups. Classical methods for surveys are focused on aggregate population-level estimates but we can learn much more using small-area estimation. The goal of this project is to build a user-accessible platform for modeling and visualizing survey data that would give estimates for arbitrary subgroups of the population, along with visualization tools to display estimates of interest.

Doctoral Dissertation Research in Economics: Benefit Disclosure in Financial Choices Online and Field Experiments

Innovations in consumer finance offering consumers choices in financial products have not increased consumers' ability to take advantage of these choices. Surveys show low financial literacy rates among US adults, resulting in financial mistakes that hurt consumers' financial well-being. Financial education to improve financial literacy have failed because of the false assumption that consumers are aware of the benefits of learning to make financial choices.

Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace Frontiers (SaTC Frontiers)

The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program welcomes proposals that address cybersecurity and privacy, and draw on expertise in one or more of these areas: computing, communication and information sciences; engineering; economics; education; mathematics; statistics; and social and behavioral sciences. Proposals that advance the field of cybersecurity and privacy within a single discipline or interdisciplinary efforts that span multiple disciplines are both encouraged.

Deadline: 

Friday, July 5, 2019

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