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National Science Foundation

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Doctoral Dissertation Research: An Historical Study of Medical, Scientific, and Cultural Perspectives on Vision

This doctoral dissertation research project is a study of vision that traces the development of ophthalmology in early modern Europe. The research will use archival sources and historical analysis to investigate the ways in which the eye was studied, eye diseases were treated, and the knowledge of the eye was transmitted during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Europe. Knowledge of the eye not only formed a critical branch of medical and technological investigation, it was also of cultural and scientific significance.

A Science of Science Policy Approach to Analyzing and Innovating the Biomedical Research Enterprise (SCISIPBIO)

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are interested in proposals that will propel our understanding of the biomedical research enterprise by drawing from the scientific expertise of the science of science policy research community.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier: Core Research

The Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (FW-HTF), one of the Big Ideas, is one mechanism by which NSF is responding to the challenges and opportunities for the future of jobs and work.

Deadline: 

Monday, March 9, 2020

Dynamic Pricing and Matching with Asymmetric Information

This award funds research on two projects in economic theory. The first examines how a monopolist will choose prices over time, with a focus on how monopoly power in the product market affects how the firm makes decisions over time about production technologies. The second project is in the general area of mechanism design, the design of methods to allocate recourses. The specific application is in matching markets under incomplete information, and the work could give us new ideas about how to design allocation methods that will lead to stable outcomes.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: The direct and indirect effect of innovation subsidies

Government subsidies to support innovation in firms are a widespread policy. However, little is known about their effectiveness to promote technological upgrading and boost firm performance in developing countries. The existing rigorous studies about this type of intervention are focused on developed countries and high-tech industries, and infer technological improvement from patents and R&D expenditure.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Recovering the Polyvalent Genealogies of Machine Learning, 1948 - 2017

Machine learning techniques currently make "high-stakes" judgments in areas as diverse as criminal justice, credit risk, social welfare, hiring, and congressional redistricting. Such techniques make these decisions using patterns learned from historical social data. Emphasis on prediction rather than the circumstances of dataset creation have led to machine learning systems that preferentially target vulnerable populations for disparately adverse social judgments while making it more difficult for those subject to these decisions to protest unfair treatment.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Forest engineers, bureaucrats, and the constitution of information

The production of accurate and reliable information about rainforests and other difficult-to-survey environments constitutes an enduring challenge for state bureaucrats, scientists, and engineers. Yet the grounded processes through which key environmental information is produced have received little study. The research supported by this award takes up this problem through an anthropological investigation of the technical and bureaucratic practices through which state environmental information is created, transmitted, and applied.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Comparing Multi-Scalar Claims for Redress and Reparation

In the second half of the twentieth century, claims for redress for historical injustices have put increasing pressure on political and legal systems. This pressure is compounded by the fact that claims for reparations may occur simultaneously at international and national levels. The research supported by this award asks how international claims for redress converge on or diverge from national claims for redress from local governments.

Collaborative Research: Pennsylvania Solitary Confinement Study

The U.S. penal population is the largest in the world, but imprisonment in America is also distinguished by its extensive use of solitary confinement, defined as incarceration in a cell for 23 hours each day with limited access to visits from outsiders or rehabilitative programs. Solitary confinement is an important but understudied part of the experience of punishment in the United States. The scant available evidence suggests solitary confinement is associated with poor health and adjustment to society after incarceration.

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