The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy is now open.  Our office hours are from: 9:00am - 5:00pm, Monday - Friday. Please refer to the COVID-19 Resource Guide for all matters related to the return to campus.  All visitors and vendors must fill out the Columbia University Health Screening Form.  We look forward to seeing you on campus.

November 2022

To filter, choose a category in the above drop-down, then click "Apply."
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
 
 
 
 
Celebrating Recent Work by Jack Snyder

Celebrating Recent Work by Jack Snyder

November 03, 2022
6:15 PM ET

Location: 

Heyman Center Common Room / Hybrid Virtual

Event Type: 

New Books in the Arts and Sciences Presents:

Celebrating Recent Work by Jack Snyder

Human Rights for Pragmatists: Social Power in Modern Times

November 3, 6:15pm ET

Heyman Center Common Room / Hybrid Virtual

---

Register here for this event, and answer the registration questions to indicate whether you will join in person or on Zoom.


Human rights are among our most pressing issues today, yet rights promoters have reached an impasse in their effort to achieve rights for all. Human Rights for Pragmatists explains why: activists prioritize universal legal and moral norms, backed by the public shaming of violators, but in fact rights prevail only when they serve the interests of powerful local constituencies. Jack Snyder demonstrates that where local power and politics lead, rights follow. He presents an innovative roadmap for addressing a broad agenda of human rights concerns: impunity for atrocities, dilemmas of free speech in the age of social media, entrenched abuses of women’s rights, and more.

Exploring the historical development of human rights around the globe, Snyder shows that liberal rights–based states have experienced a competitive edge over authoritarian regimes in the modern era. He focuses on the role of power, the interests of individuals and the groups they form, and the dynamics of bargaining and coalitions among those groups. The path to human rights entails transitioning from a social order grounded in patronage and favoritism to one dedicated to equal treatment under impersonal rules. Rights flourish when they benefit dominant local actors with the clout to persuade ambivalent peers. Activists, policymakers, and others attempting to advance rights should embrace a tailored strategy, one that acknowledges local power structures and cultural practices.

Constructively turning the mainstream framework of human rights advocacy on its head, Human Rights for Pragmatists offers tangible steps that all advocates can take to move the rights project forward.

This event will be in person at the Heyman Center and live-streamed online. Please register for both in-person and virtual attendance via the link.

Please email disability@columbia.edu to request disability accommodations. Advance notice is necessary to arrange for some accessibility needs.


About the Author:

Jack Snyder is the Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Relations in the political science department and the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. His books include Electing to Fight: Why Emerging Democracies Go to War (MIT Press, 2005), co-authored with Edward D. Mansfield; From Voting to Violence: Democratization and Nationalist Conflict (Norton Books, 2000); Myths of Empire: Domestic Politics and International Ambition. (Cornell University Press, 1991); The Ideology of the Offensive: Military Decision Making and the Disasters of 1914 (Cornell 1984); and Civil Wars, Insecurity, and Intervention, co-editor with Barbara Walter (Columbia University Press, 1999).

About the speakers:

 

Sarah Daly Assistant Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. She has been a visiting associate research scholar in Latin American Studies at Princeton University, a pre-doctoral fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, and a post-doctoral fellow in the Political Science Department and at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University.

James A. Goldston is the executive director of the Open Society Justice Initiative, which advances the rule of law and rights protection worldwide through advocacy, litigation, research, and the promotion of legal capacity. A leading practitioner of international human rights and criminal law, Goldston has litigated several groundbreaking cases before the European Court of Human Rights and United Nations treaty bodies, including on issues of counterterrorism, racial discrimination, and torture.

Joseph Slaughter specializes in literature, law, and socio-cultural history of the Global South (particularly Latin America and Africa). He’s especially interested in the social work of literature—the myriad ways in which literature intersects (formally, historically, ideologically, materially) with problems of social justice, human rights, intellectual property, and international law. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Comparative literature.

Andreas Wimmer is the Lieber Professor of Sociology and Political Philosophy in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. His research brings a long-term historical and globally comparative perspective to the questions of how states are built and nations formed, how racial and ethnic hierarchies form or dissolve in the process, and when this will result in conflict and war. Most recently, he is trying to understand how ideas and institutions travel across the world and with what consequences.


Register here for this event, and answer the registration questions to indicate whether you will join in person or on Zoom.

This event is sponsored by ISERP, the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, the Office of the Divisional Deans in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Political Science Department, and Institute for the Study of Human Rights

6:15 PM ET
 
 
 
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
 
 
 
 
Celebrating Recent Work by Nadia Abu El-Haj

Celebrating Recent Work by Nadia Abu El-Haj

November 17, 2022
6:15 PM ET

Location: 

The Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room, Columbia University

Event Type: 

New Books in the Arts and Sciences Presents:

Celebrating Recent Work by Nadia Abu El-Haj

Combat Trauma: Imaginaries of War and Citizenship in post-9/11 America

November 17, 6:15pm ET 

Heyman Center Common Room / Hybrid Virtual

---

Register here for this event, and answer the registration questions to indicate whether you will join in person or on Zoom.


Americans have long been asked to support the troops and care for veterans’ psychological wounds. Who, though, does this injunction serve?

As acclaimed scholar Nadia Abu El-Haj argues here, in the American public’s imagination, the traumatized soldier stands in for destructive wars abroad, with decisive ramifications in the post-9/11 era. Across the political spectrum the language of soldier trauma is used to discuss American warfare, producing a narrative in which traumatized soldiers are the only acknowledged casualties of war, while those killed by American firepower are largely sidelined and forgotten.

In this wide-ranging and fascinating study of the meshing of medicine, science, and politics, Abu El-Haj explores the concept of post-traumatic stress disorder and the history of its medical diagnosis. While antiwar Vietnam War veterans sought to address their psychological pain even as they maintained full awareness of their guilt and responsibility for perpetrating atrocities on the killing fields of Vietnam, by the 1980s, a peculiar convergence of feminist activism against sexual violence and Reagan’s right-wing “war on crime” transformed the idea of PTSD into a condition of victimhood. In so doing, the meaning of Vietnam veterans’ trauma would also shift, moving away from a political space of reckoning with guilt and complicity to one that cast them as blameless victims of a hostile public upon their return home. This is how, in the post-9/11 era of the Wars on Terror, the injunction to "support our troops," came to both sustain US militarism and also shields American civilians from the reality of wars fought ostensibly in their name.

In this compelling and crucial account, Nadia Abu El-Haj challenges us to think anew about the devastations of the post-9/11 era.

This event will be in person at the Heyman Center and live-streamed online. Please register for both in-person and virtual attendance via the link.

Please email disability@columbia.edu to request disability accommodations. Advance notice is necessary to arrange for some accessibility needs.

About the Author:

Nadia Abu El-Haj is Ann Whitney Olin Professor in the Departments of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University, Co-Director of the Center for Palestine Studies, and Chair of the Governing Board of the Society of Fellows/Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. She also serves as Vice President and Vice Chair of the Board at The Institute for Palestine Studies in Washington DC. The recipient of numerous awards, including from the Social Science Research Council, the Wenner Gren Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Harvard Academy for Area and International Studies, the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, she is the author of numerous journal articles published on topics ranging from the history of archaeology in Palestine to the question of race and genomics today.

About the Speakers:

Thomas W. Dodman is an Assistant Professor of French at Columbia University. His first book, What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion explores how people once died of nostalgia in order to tell a larger story about social transformation and alienation in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He also co-edits the French journal Sensibilités: histoire, critique & sciences sociales, and serves on the editorial board of Critical Historical Studies.

Catherine Fennell’s work examines the cultural transformation of the American welfare state and the effects of this transformation on the politics of citizenship, belonging and race within redeveloping cities. Through her ethnographic research, she has focused on how large-scale changes in the urban built environment shape the ways in which urbanites come to understand social difference, and practice new forms of social care, concern and intimacy.

Miriam Ticktin is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the CUNY Graduate Center. She came from the New School for Social Research, where she was Chair of Anthropology from 2016-2018, Co-Director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility [newschool.edu] between 2013-2016 and Director of Gender Studies from 2012-2013. She received her PhD in Anthropology at Stanford University and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris, France, and an MA in English Literature from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. Miriam also was a Fellow in the Society of Fellows (2002-2004).


This event is sponsored by ISERP, the Office of the Divisional Deans in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Anthropology (Barnard), the Affect Studies Seminar, and The Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities.

 

6:15 PM ET
 
 
 
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
 
 
 
Celebrating Recent Work by Hilary Hallett (CANCELLED)

Celebrating Recent Work by Hilary Hallett (CANCELLED)

November 30, 2022
6:15PM - 7:30PM ET

Location: 

The Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room, Columbia University

Event Type: 

EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED

New Books in the Arts and Sciences Presents:

Celebrating Recent Work by Hilary Hallett

Inventing the It Girl: How Elinor Glyn Invented Modern Romance and Conquered Early Hollywood

November 30, 6:15pm - 7:30pm ET

Heyman Center Common Room / Hybrid Virtual

---

Register here for this event, and answer the registration questions to indicate whether you will join in person or on Zoom.


The modern romance novel is elevated to a subject of serious study in this addictively readable biography of pioneering celebrity author Elinor Glyn (1864–1943). In elegant prose, Hilary A. Hallett traces Glyn’s meteoric rise from a depressed society darling to a world-renowned celebrity author who consorted with world leaders from St. Petersburg to Cairo to New York. After reporting from the trenches during World War I, the author was lured by American movie producers from Paris to Los Angeles for her remarkable third act. Weaving together years of deep archival research, Hallett movingly conveys how Glyn, more than any other individual during the Roaring Twenties, crafted early Hollywood’s glamorous romantic aesthetic. She taught the screen’s greatest leading men to make love in ways that set audiences aflame, and coined the term “It Girl,” which turned actress Clara Bow into the symbol of the first sexual revolution.

With Inventing the It Girl, Hallett has done nothing less than elevate the origins of the modern romance genre to a subject of serious study. In doing so, she has also reclaimed the enormous influence of one of Anglo-America’s most significant cultural tastemakers while revealing Glyn’s life to have been as sensational as any of the characters she created on the page or screen. The result is a groundbreaking portrait of a courageous icon of independence who encouraged future generations to chase their desires wherever they might lead.

This event will be in person at the Heyman Center and livestreamed online. Please register for both in-person and virtual attendance via the link. Registration is mandatory for in-person attendance.

Please email disability@columbia.edu to request disability accommodations. Advance notice is necessary to arrange for some accessibility needs.

About the Author:

Hilary Hallett is the Mendelson Family Professor and Director of American Studies, and Associate Professor of History where she teaches modern American cultural and social history. Her areas of specialization include women and gender history; histories of popular and mass culture from a transatlantic perspective; and histories of American culture industries, particularly theater, music, film, and Hollywood's history. She is interested in mass media’s relationship to social change and to the big stories they tell about America and Americans over time.

About the Speakers:

Farran Smith Nehme has written about film and film history for the New York Post, Barron’s, the Wall Street Journal, Film Comment, the Village Voice, and Sight & Sound, as well as for her blog, Self-Styled Siren. Her novel, Missing Reels, was published in 2014.

Pablo Piccato is a Professor and the Chair of the Department of History at Columbia University. His research and teaching focus on modern Mexico, particularly on crime, politics, and culture. He has taught as visiting faculty in universities in Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, and France, and has been director of Columbia’s Institute of Latin American Studies, Vice Chair of the Department of History, and University Senator.

Alice Kessler-Harris is the R. Gordon Hoxie Professor Emerita of American History at Columbia University, and former president of the Organization of American Historians. She is a specialist in American labor and comparative and interdisciplinary explorations of women and gender. Her most recent book is A Difficult Woman: The Challenging Life and Times of Lillian Hellman (Bloomsbury Press 2012).


This event is sponsored by ISERP, the Office of the Divisional Deans in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Department of History, the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, the Center for American Studies, and The Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities.

6:15PM - 7:30PM ET
 
 
 
 

Newsletter

Don't want to miss our interesting news and updates! Make sure to join our newsletter list.

* indicates required

Contact us

For general questions about ISERP programs, services, and events.