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National Science Foundation

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Workshop: Translation and Encoding for the Making and Knowing Project

This award is to support a workshop in Toulouse, France, in late June 2017. It is to be held in conjunction with ongoing research at the Center for Science and Society at Columbia University, the Making and Knowing Project. The workshop is the fourth in a series of interdisciplinary transcription, translation, and encoding workshops. The previous three facilitated an accurate encoded transcription of a French historical text, Manuscript Fr. 640.

Innovations at the Nexus of Food, Energy and Water Systems (INFEWS)

The overarching goal of INFEWS is to catalyze well-integrated interdisciplinary and convergent research to transform scientific understanding of the FEW nexus (integrating all three components rather than addressing them separately), in order to improve system function and management, address system stress, increase resilience, and ensure sustainability. The NSF INFEWS initiative is designed specifically to attain the following goals:

Deadline: 

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Information Transmission and Aggregation

This award funds research that uses game theory to analyze situations where information has an important effect on how individual decisions lead to group outcomes.

Information-Constrained Dynamic Models of Choice Behavior

This project will explore models of the cognitive processes underlying human choice behavior in economic contexts. The models to be explored allow for departures from fully-informed optimal choice. Rather than positing that behavior is simply "irrational," they will explain departures from optimal decision-making as resulting from the (generally pre-conscious) use of choice algorithms that are well-suited to mostly achieving decision makers' objectives. The choice algoritms also would not require greater information-processing capacity.

Prices in Space and Time

This proposal aims to use price data for the universe of goods that have barcodes or are available online to answer three main questions: How do goods prices and product variety vary across space? What are the problems with using online prices as a substitute for offline prices to measure inflation? How do prices and quantities respond to high frequency macroeconomic shocks? In order to answer these questions, this project seeks to measure exact price indexes for goods across cities.

Doctoral Dissertation Research in Economics: Individual, Family and Community Impacts of Criminal Sentencing

Over the past 30 years, the incarcerated population in the United States has grown by close to 300 percent. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that in 2009, 7.2 million adults in the United States, or 1 out of every 31 adults, were under "correctional supervision," a status that includes probation and parole in addition to incarceration. The wide reach of corrections activity translates into roughly $51.7 billion dollars or 7.4 percent of state budgets in fiscal year 2011.

Topics in Dynamic Panel Data Analysis, Time-Varying Individual Heterogeneities, and Cross-Sectional Dependence

This research deals with estimation and inference problems for dynamic panel-data models under time-varying individual heterogeneities and cross-sectional dependence (common shocks). An important aspect of these problems is that the individual heterogeneity and the common shocks are correlated with the explanatory variables. This correlation is fundamental for economic variables. Standard procedures such as within-group estimators will lead to inconsistent inferences. This research explores new estimation procedures and related inference problems.

Doctoral Dissertation Research in Economics: Essays on the determinants of healthcare differences in US hospitals

Healthcare differences are pervasive in United States hospitals. This proposal aims to understand why patients with the same underlying health conditions receive different treatments, incur different costs, and experience different outcomes. There are conceivably many factors that affect patient care, but one factor may be the quality of the patient's attending physician, and another factor may be the patient's health insurance category.

CAREER: Health Determinants and Research Design

What determines human health is known only in part. Even where causal pathways have been identified, great uncertainty frequently exists regarding the strength of the relationship. Compelling and precise estimates of these relationships are needed to inform public policies that will improve population health. This project would improve understanding of these relationships, using natural and quasi-experiments.

Critical Resilient Interdependent Infrastructure Systems and Processes (CRISP)

The goals of the Critical Resilient Interdependent Infrastructure Systems and Processes (CRISP) solicitation are to: (1) foster an interdisciplinary research community of engineers, computer and computational scientists and social and behavioral scientists, that creates new approaches and engineering solutions for the design and operation of infrastructures as processes and services; (2) enhance the understanding and design of interdependent critical infrastructure systems (ICIs) and processes that provide essential goods and services despite disruptions and failures from any cause, natural

Deadline: 

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

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