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National Science Foundation

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Documenting Endangered Languages - Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants (DEL-DDRIG)

This funding partnership supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used languages, this effort aims to exploit advances in information technology to build computational infrastructure for endangered language research. The program supports projects that contribute to data management and archiving, and to the development of the next generation of researchers.

CAREER: Interdealer Networks and the Distribution of Credit Risk

This project examines how the network of trading relationships determined by the interdealer market determines how US banks interact on this market and how this affects the banks' ultimate exposures to credit risk. The Financial Crisis of 2007 - 2009 and ensuing recession highlighted the importance of bank interconnectedness. However, facts about the trades and positions of complex financial institutions are generally difficult to obtain.

Social Psychology

The Social Psychology Program at NSF supports basic research on human social behavior, including cultural differences and development over the life span.

Among the many research topics supported are: attitude formation and change, social cognition, personality processes, interpersonal relations and group processes, the self, emotion, social comparison and social influence, and the psychophysiological and neurophysiological bases of social behavior.

Deadline: 

Friday, July 15, 2022
Monday, July 17, 2023

Doctoral Dissertation Research in Economics: Reference Dependence and Option Adjustable Rate Mortgages

This awards funds data expenses for dissertation research. The project focuses on how homeowners who hold 'Option ARM' mortgages make financial decisions. The goal is to determine whether or not these homeowners are using so-called reference points in making their decisions about how to pay down credit card debt while also making mortgage payments.

Matching Theory and College Admissions

This award funds research in the economic theory of matching methods.

RIDIR: Collaborative Research: Computational and Historical Resources on Nations and Organizations for the Social Sciences (CHRONOS)

This project will collect, process, and analyze millions of U.S. government records concerning international relations, develop tools to explore these records, and make all of them available on a single website with an Application Programming Interface. The project will demonstrate how computational techniques can aid both qualitative and quantitative social science research on a range of areas of major public interest, expanding knowledge about terrorism, intelligence, international trade and aid.

DHB: Decentralization and Local Public Goods: How Does Allocation of Decision-Making Authority Affect Provision?

Access to services such as sanitation, health care and education remains inadequate for much of the world's population. As much as 20 percent of the world's population lack safe drinking water and sanitation. The objective of this study is to determine under what conditions decentralization of decision-making authority improves access to services. The project focuses on safe drinking water, though the analysis applies to all services and more broadly to other types of organizations. Decentralization and its benefits have been popular topics in academic and policy literatures.

Doctoral Dissertation Research in DRMS: Does participation in project decision-making affect how intended beneficiaries report project outcomes?

Improving access to social services such as safe water and sanitation, education and health care depends on being able to learn what approaches work better than others, when and why. Household surveys of intended beneficiaries are an essential source of information about program effectiveness. Recent evidence, however, suggests that these survey data may be unreliable because program beneficiaries may change the way they report their behavior as a result of the program.

HSD: Collaborative Research: Social Networks as Agents of Change in Climate Change Policy Making

Whereas all nations are exposed to the same dominant scientific consensus established by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, their reactions to this knowledge are highly variable. National stances toward global climate change cannot be explained by levels of prosperity or immediate vulnerability to disaster. This interdisciplinary research project will examine the key sociopolitical variables that affect how national polities react to scientific knowledge. Multiple constituencies form networks of action that effect national policies.

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